Quick Links

Skip to main content Skip to navigation

LCC School LogoLaurel Concord Coleridge Public Schools

Main Navigation

Top

Front Page > breadcrumbs: High School >

Working...

Ajax Loading Image

 

LCC High School Course Descriptions

Laurel-Concord-Coleridge School
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


ENGLISH COURSES


ENGLISH 9

In the ninth grade, the curriculum focuses on vocabulary,
literature, writing skills and applied grammar. 

Literature consists of the reading of poetry,
plays, short stories, nonfiction and novels, and stressing the elements of each
type of literature. Much of the literature that we read contains historical
and/or multicultural foundations.

Writing will incorporate descriptive, narrative,
and expository. Applied grammar will place emphasis on language
mechanics, parts of the sentence, adjectives, adverbs, verbal and
compound/complex sentences. There will be a special focus on informative writing
which will require research, review of the five paragraph essay, organizing
information using an outline, an introduction to MLA citation and formatting
and an oral presentation of the gathered information.

 

ENGLISH ENHANCEMENT

 

 

 

ENGLISH 10

This class encompasses writing, literature, vocabulary, spelling, and grammar and usage study.  The forms of writing each student will complete during the course of the year are as follows:  autobiographical incident, observing situations and settings, poetry, comparison and contrast, cause and effect, problem and solution, controversial issue, and interpretive essay.  Students will be required to prewrite, write, edit and rewrite each piece of written work for final evaluation.  Each student will also be required to submit a portfolio of his/her written work for final evaluation.

A quarter of the class will be spent on Speech.  The class will be required to write and present a persuasive speech, oral interpretation of prose, and poetry, concentrating on writing, organization, character analysis, presentation and listening skills.

Vocabulary and spelling will be studied and tested on a weekly basis.  Grammar study will include the eight parts of speech, the sentence, the phrase, the clause, correct agreement, using pronouns correctly, using verbs correctly, and using modifiers correctly.  Usage study will include capitalization, and punctuation.

Literature study will cover the short story, the novel, drama and poetry.

 

ENGLISH 11

This class encompasses writing, literature, vocabulary, spelling, and grammar and usage study.  The forms of writing each student will complete during the course of the year are as follows:  memoir, interview profile, the short story, classification, examining changes, drawing conclusions, persuasive essay, critical analysis.  Students will be required to prewrite, write, edit and rewrite each piece of written work for final evaluation.  Each student will also be required to submit a portfolio of his/her written work for final evaluation, with an emphasis on persuasive writing in preparation for the state writing standards.

Vocabulary and spelling will be studied and tested on a weekly basis.  Grammar study will include the eight parts of speech, the sentence, the phrase, the clause, correct agreement, using pronouns correctly, using verbs correctly, and using modifiers correctly.  Usage study will include capitalization, and punctuation.

Literature study will cover the short story, the novel, drama and poetry. The student will concentrate on the different types of text, theme, elements of fiction, literary devices, and informational material in preparation for the state assessment.

 

ENGLISH 12

This class encompasses writing, literature, vocabulary, spelling, grammar and usage study.  Each student will complete a research paper, and vocabulary will be studied and tested on a weekly basis. Literature study will cover the short story, the novel, drama and poetry.  The student will concentrate on the different types of text, theme, elements of fiction and poetry, and literary devices.
 

ENGLISH 1010 *CC

English Composition 1010 is designed to develop writing skills.  Students write short papers and essays based upon their personal experience and/or assigned readings. The course emphasizes the clear written expression of ideas and importance of organization, word choice, logic and sentence construction.  The process of planning, writing, revising, and editing essays for a particular audience is also emphasized. 

 

English 1020 *CC

Similar to English Composition 1010, but with an emphasis on the technique of reading and explicating works of literature, particularly the novel and poetry.   

 

SPEECH/ADV SPEECH

 

Advanced Speech focuses on a four part curriculum: theater, competitive Speech, interpersonal communication, and group dynamics. Within these four areas, the class will study the contexts of communication, the process of sending and receiving, listening, social rituals, interviewing, leadership and conflict, informative and persuasive speaking, oral interpretation, preparing a speech, and the delivery of a speech.

 

ACT PREP

The purpose of ACT Prep is to help college-bound juniors and seniors better prepare for the ACT examination. The course will provide an overview of the test, including: English, math, reading, science. Students will be given time to complete simulated ACT examinations. Copies of the ACT Prep Guide and access to online resources will be provided for each student using the John Baylor Test Prep Program.  Course work also includes preparing for college, scholarship applications, and other activities that help prepare for the college and work force experience.

 

 


SCIENCE COURSES


PHYSICAL SCIENCE

Physical Science is broken up into two semesters with one semester being primarily physics, or the study of motion and the other being chemistry, or the study of matter. The physics unit is spent primarily studying laws of motion, forces in matter-including a unit on relativity, energy, light, and sound.  The chemistry unit places emphasis on general chemical principles, the basics of matter and the periodic table, and the relationship of these things to our everyday lives. Organic Chemistry is taught with emphasis on nomenclature and basic functional groups and their relationships to our lives. 

 

BIOLOGY

A study of principles of biology in which the characteristics of living organisms are investigated.  Special emphasis of principles as they apply to the uniformity, diversity and organization of the plant and animal kingdom and their environmental relationships will be stressed.  General topics of study include characteristics of life, genetics, evolution, representatives of the protozoan, plant, and animal kingdoms.

ANATOMY/PHYSIOLOGY 

Consists of the following short courses:
1) Anatomy - the name and function of body parts. 
2) Physiology-the study of the relationship between all the internal organs. 
3) Cytology-study of cells and their function. 
4) Biochemistry-the interrelationship between biology and chemistry.
5) Histology-the study of different tissues that make-up the human body. The use of activities, projects  and labs are used whenever possible to show how these systems are related to human health.  Science research projects are incorporated into the curriculum. Safety is a priority.

CHEMISTRY

Atomic theory and molecular concept, kinetic theory, atomic structure and chemical bonding, principles of chemical reactions and molecular structure.  Fundamental concepts of chemistry will be introduced, developed and utilized.

 

PHYSICS

A strong background in physics is provided by stressing the major concepts that students will need to apply regularly.  Also studied are:
Fundamental mathematics, measurement, straight line motion, graphical analysis of motion, vectors, dynamics, momentum and its conservation, motion in two dimensions, universal gravitation, work and power, energy and its conservation, hear, optics, electricity, magnetism, atomic physics.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Environmental Science is a year-long course designed to show  connections between a variety of science disciplines.  It gives students an understanding and realistic picture of the applications of a variety of scientific concepts as they manifest in our environment.  Students will focus on human population growth, natural resources, and ecosystem dynamics.  The aim of this course to increase students knowledge of the environmental challenges of today, while continuing to cultivate scientific critical thinking skills.

FORENSIC SCIENCE

This course surveys key topics in forensic science, including the application of the scientific process to forensic analysis, procedures and principles of crime scene investigation, physical and trace evidence from the perspective of the forensic scientist.  Through online lessons, virtual and hands-on labs, and analysis of fictional crime scenarios, students learn about forensic tools, technical resources, forming and testing hypotheses, proper data collection, and responsible conclusions.

 

INDEPENDENT SCIENCE RESEARCH

Science Research is offered only on an instructor approval basis to students 9-12 with a special interest in science.  Students need to be enrolled in all science and math classes to be eligible for this course.  This class is inquiry based with students working on various research projects to serve the needs of high ability or high interest students. Students are expected to participate in field trips and additional activities outside the classroom. Special short research projects will be given to students. These instructor-designed projects help the student develop or improve information gathering techniques, deductive reasoning and data analysis.  Students will also be working on a special interest project of their own design.  The data that is gathered will be kept in a daily logbook so that this information can be organized into a paper. These papers will be presented to judges at a yearly Junior Academy of Science contest at Wayne State College.  Students should be taking all the science and math classes LCC offers in order to qualify. Safety is a priority.

PRACTICAL SCIENCE

This course is application based inquiry approach to teaching science concepts used in everyday life. Problem solving and group projects will be used throughout the curriculum. Topics will include consumer chemistry, agriculture, health, water science, ecology, local and global issues, and technology.

 

 

 


SOCIAL SCIENCE COURSES


WORLD HISTORY

The curriculum for ninth grade social studies is based on World History.  Students will study a survey of the most significant events in World History. The course begins a little before 1000 A.D. and examines events up to present time. Highlights of the course work include elements of European, African, Asian, and American History. Students will utilize their textbooks as well as the Internet, library, and current online periodicals. 

AMERICAN HISTORY

The course focuses on American History from the Civil War to World War II. Emphasis will be on people, places, stories and circumstances in history and less emphasis on memorization of specific dates and times. The year will be organized in units derived from the textbook including:

1. The Union in Crisis (1850-1877) – Origins of the Civil War, Civil War and Reconstruction

2. An Industrial Nation (1860-1920) – Settling of the West, the Industrial Revolution and the start of the 20th Century

3. Becoming a World Power (1898-1920) – Progressivism, Imperialism and WWI

4. A Modern Nation (1919-1940) – The Roaring 20s, Great Depression and the New Deal

5. A Champion of Democracy (1939-1960) – The origins of WWII, WWII and the beginning of the Cold War

GOVERNMENT

This course focuses on the major elements of our current form of government. Emphasis will be placed on the Founding Fathers and the reasons they created a Republic and not a Democracy. The course will then move on to modern-day government and the changes that have taken place since 1787. We will learn about each of the 3 branches of government and the roles they have taken today.

Current events will also be discussed and written about as time and circumstances in the nation dictate.

The Nebraska Unicameral will also be studied and discussed throughout the year.

 

ECONOMICS

Basic economic theory is the foundation of this course as students learn how fundamental decisions about the four factors of production are made. Key topics covered include: law of supply and demand; saving, borrowing, and spending; the Federal Reserve System and the money supply; and the role of government in an open market economy.

HUMANITIES

This class focuses on American history beginning after World War II, with The Cold War and ending with the Nixon years in the early 1970’s.  Each unit utilizes a combination of film, documentary, and the fiction and/ or nonfiction novel as a complement to the textbook.  The textbook utilized is American Anthem by Holt Rinehart Winston, copyright 2007.  This class strives to present a factual historical view of each time period as well as providing a focus on an individual humanistic account of the experience as well.

 

 

 

 

 


MATHEMATICS


ALGEBRA A/B

Algebra A

This course covers the algebraic concepts from the first half of the traditional Algebra I course at a slower pace.  Topics include:  properties of the number system, solving equations, linear functions, exponents, and radicals.  Work will be done primarily during class time with more repetition and life skills application.

Algebra B

This course is designed to follow Algebra A so that a student will have covered all the material of Algebra I with completion of the class.  Again, material will be covered at a slower pace with work being done mostly in class.  Topics covered are polynomials, quadratics, inequalities, systems of equations, and manipulation of rational and radical expressions. 


ALGEBRA I 

The content and questions of this class integrate geometry, probability, and statistics together with algebra.  Pure and applied mathematics are also integrated throughout. These topics are not isolated as separate units of study or enrichment.  They are employed to motivate, justify, extend and otherwise enhance important concepts of algebra.  Four dimensions of understanding are emphasized to maximize performance: skill in carrying out various algorithms; developing and using mathematics properties and relationships;  applying mathematics in realistic situations;  and representing or picturing mathematical concepts.  Students will learn to use mathematics effectively through problem-solving experiences that include use of higher-order thinking skills in daily assignments, a wide variety of problem types in the questions, and open-ended problems.

This course begins to develop algebra skills used to simplify expressions, solve equations and inequalities, solve systems of equations, graph equations, perform operations with polynomials, factor polynomials, and simplify rational and radical expressions.


 


GEOMETRY 

Four dimensions of understanding are emphasized:  skill in drawing, visualizing, and mathematical relationships and proofs;  using geometric ideas in real situations;  andrepresenting geometric concepts with coordinates, networks or other diagrams.  There is a significant amount of algebra employed to motivate, justify, extend and otherwise enhance the geometry.  The coordinate and transformational approaches connect geometry with algebra and transformations are functions, which allow all figures to be considered as geometric. 

PRACTICAL GEOMETRY

Students will develop and use geometric ideas in real situations; represent geometric concepts with coordinates and networks; identify and solve 2 and 3 dimensional figures.

ALGEBRA II

The student is expected to work out daily assigned problems and exercises.  This course consists of a review of fundamentals, functional relations, systems of equations, radicals, quadratic equations, exponents, powers, roots, logarithms, sequences, equations of higher degree, matrices and determinants.  Extensive use of programmable/graphing calculators is incorporated.

 

ADVANCED MATH

The student is expected to work out daily assigned problems and exercises.  This course includes the analysis of the parent functions and new ideas of binary bases, modulo numbers, inequalities, parametric equations and vectors.  The topics of Discrete Math include logic, recursion, mathematical induction, combinatorics, graphs and circuits. Technology is a must in this class and is integrated throughout as an evaluation and analytical tool. 

 

STANDARDS MATH

This course is designed to follow Algebra A and B with a wide survey of mathematical concepts, including numeration and number sense, computation and estimation, measurement,  geometry and spatial concepts, data analysis, probability, statistical concepts, and algebraic concepts.  The majority of class work will be done within the classroom with a combination of written material, hands-on activities, and online lessons. 

 

CALCULUS

This class is designed both for prospective mathematics majors and for students whose primary interest is in engineering, the physical and social sciences, or non-technical fields.  The presentation of material is still geared to a beginner's experience and maturity.  The step-by step explanations, abundant worked examples and wide variety of exercise continue to be distinctive features of this text.  The nine chapters of TC7 cover functions of a single variable, limits, continuity, derivatives, and the definite integral with review and application of logarithmic, exponential, inverse and hyperbolic functions. This class can be taken for college credit.

 


ELECTIVE COURSES



ACCOUNTING I

Planning a career in business? Owning your own business?  Need help for personal use?  Accounting I will give you the background knowledge for personal use or continued study in a post-secondary school.  You will complete accounting tasks, using a double-entry system, for service and merchandising businesses.  Activities include the completion of special problems using the microcomputer.
 

ACCOUNTING II

Study topics include the review of the basic accounting model, accounting for merchandising operations, the use of special-purpose journals, and the measuring and reporting of assets and current liabilities.  This course may be taken for college credit through Northeast Community College.
 

ADULT LIVING


You will gain the knowledge and skills to make informed decisions as you assume adult roles and responsibilities—to become independent, responsible, and engaged members of society, with emphasis on the next 5-10 years of your life.   These decisions are organized into three broad categories:  financial literacy, relationship literacy and life/work literacy.  Topics studied include:  YOU (personality, temperament, genetics, and environment), communication skills, relationship skills, sexuality, engagement & marriage, decision making in families, and taking care of financial responsibilities and managing money as an adult.
 

ADVANCED PE

This class is an elective offering that is activity based, primarily in the weight room. Each student will be expected to complete various workouts in the weight room as well as agility and plyometric exercises in the gym.

 

ADVANCED WOODS

Advanced Woodworking Class is open to any student that has completed the Woods I course. Course content is designed to expand woodworking skills to a high level. Students are encouraged to develop independent work habits and self-motivation is necessary to complete a complex project.

AGRIBUSINESS

This class will learn the concepts and skills necessary for farm management and agribusiness management. Topics of study will include the following: Setting Goals, Record Keeping Systems, Net Worth, Cash Flow, Financial Analysis, Budget Analysis, Types of Budgeting systems, Cost and Return Analysis, Marketing a product and marketing strategies, Futures Commodities (the futures market), Risk Management, Investment Analysis, Taxes and Tax Considerations, Professional Organizations, Entrepreneurship, Farming Cooperatives, International Trade, and Agricultural Law. An Agricultural Current Event will be due every other Friday with written and oral evaluation. A Supervised Agricultural Experience Program (SAE) will be graded as 20%.

ANIMAL SCIENCE

This class will learn the concepts and skills necessary for careers in animal science and livestock production. The class will discuss topics revolving around management and operation of dairy, beef, swine, sheep, poultry, and horse production including the following: Breeds of livestock, Animal parts and structure, Livestock judging, USDA quality and yield grades, Meat and Carcass Evaluation, Animal Reproduction, Genetics, Animal nutrition, and Vet science. An Agricultural Current Event will be due every other Friday with written and oral evaluation. A Supervised Agricultural Experience Program (SAE) will be graded as 20% of the final grade.

BAND

At this level, quality performance, competition, self-discipline, and pride play a very big role in our program.  A variety of music from various styles is presented each year. Six (6) objectives are used and are listed in the curriculum guide.  Public concerts are performed which include the Veteran's Day Program, Christmas Concert,  Spring Concert, along with jazz band competitions, District Music Contest, pep band performances, commencement, and other depending on public request.  Three-six trips are taken during the year including marching band competition, jazz band competitions, district music contest, possible concert tour and state fair.  The high school pep band (when available) also performs at football, volleyball and basketball games.

 

CAREERS/MEDIA

This course is a project-based class.  Throughout the year students will be initiating projects related to the 6 field clusters.  These career clusters are Business, Marketing and Management; Environmental and Agricultural Systems; Communication and Information Systems; Industrial, Manufacturing, and Engineering Systems; Health Sciences; and Human Services and Resources.  Through these projects students will have a better understanding on how to lead, direct and manage projects and people.  This in turn should provide them with resumes experiences. This course will also focus on designing, implementing and producing the yearbook.  Students will be engaged in photography, writing and will use a program called Indesign to create the yearbook.
 

CERAMICS

Ceramics is a 3 dimensional class that will spend the first half of the year creating hand built projects, relief sculptures, figures, Clay heads, vases, and work on the wheel. The second half of the year students will be working on more independent projects.

CHILD DEVELOPMENT/HOUSING

Parenting styles, pregnancy, birth and the development of the child through age 6 are studied.  Research on the costs of baby, choosing safe child care, and car seat safety will be some of the information learned in this class.  Hands on projects with children will be an important part of the learning in Child Development.  In Housing, you will learn about the universal need for housing and how it is met around the world.  Styles of housing in the U.S., reading floor plans, the elements and principles of design, and an interior decorating project will be the main areas of learning in this class.

 

CHORUS

Sr. High Mixed Chorus is for students in grades 9-12.  The focus of the class is to improve the quality of life for all students by developing their capacities to participate fully in their musical culture.  Choir consists of a well-planned sequence of learning experiences which are challenging and rigorous.  The music studied reflects a broad range of genres, styles and periods.  The music performed is of the highest quality within each genre, style and period.  Skills in music literacy (reading music) are emphasized. Vocal technique, aimed at healthy, technically correct vocal production, is stressed which will enable the participants to have confidence in their musical capabilities and enjoy singing throughout their lives. The group will perform in school concerts (3-4), clinics, and contests scheduled throughout the school year.  Students seeking personal enrichment experiences will have the opportunity to participate in auditioned Honor Choirs, and All State Festivals. In addition, students are encouraged to become involved in community/church musical activities.  

Swing Choir is an auditioned group open to choir members only.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS

This course is advancing into the 21st century skills.  iMac computer programs will be used to produce mail able business forms.  Both proofreading and formatting skills will be emphasized.  Students will gain advanced skills in word processing, database, and spreadsheets using both Word and Appleworks.  Students will also use iphoto, imovie, idvd to produce a DVD.  
 

CONSTRUCTION/MANUFACTURING & DESIGN

Construction/Manufacturing & Design is a two-semester class. Construction is offered the first semester, and Manufacturing & Design is offered the second semester.  The student may take both semesters of learning or just one without a prerequisite.

During Construction Class, the student will explore the various building trades, building materials, occupations and construction techniques.   The student will learn how to construct a small shed, garage or other structure that demonstrates building trades.  The student will also design a small house using AutoCAD Program.

In Manufacturing & Design Class the student will develop a product, design the product, construct a prototype of that product, and manufacture the product.  This gives the student an understanding of today’s industries and develops skills in today’s industrial manufacturing industries. 

 

DRAFTING TECHNOLOGY

This class is open to any 10-12th grade student, with Intro to Tech as a preferred prerequisite.  Students going into all technical areas and engineering are encouraged to take this class.  Areas of study include: architectural drafting, and mechanical drafting.  Each student will design a house, draw complete plans, and construct a house to scale.  In mechanical drawing the student will draw isometric and multi-view drawings of actual industrial problems.  In Advanced Drafting all drawings will be on the computer.

DRAWING

Drawing is the basics of all other mediums of art. In this class we will be exploring: perspective, proportions, ratios, textures, patterns, and rendering. We will be working in both black and white and color drawings. Students will use many different types of mediums to be completing their work.

 

FOODS & NUTRITION


Foods & Nutrition will teach you skills for life in the areas of food preparation and how diet impacts your life.  If you plan on going into any health care career or just want to know more about nutrition for personal application, this course gives you the foundation of nutrition knowledge.  Interspersed between nutrition principles are food preparation skills and techniques, food safety, designing your kitchen, and learning about how foods interact through various foods labs/cooking/baking experiences.


GRAPHIC DESIGN

Graphic Design is a computer-based course. Students will learn to use basic to complex tools and skills through Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign. The first half of the year students will work on skill building activities and learn new techniques. The second half will be set up as a mock internship. The students will work with layout, proper sizing, and printing the finished project. They will also present their ideas and rational to the class. Deadlines will be very important and taken seriously.

 

INTERIOR DESIGN & HOUSING/CLOTHING & FASHION

Interior Design & Housing will teach students about the different types of housing available. This includes housing styles past and present. Students will learn color schemes, design principles, use of space, and traffic patterns. Students will also create floor plans, as well as design rooms that are functional and meet the individual needs. Landscaping is also covered in this course.

 

Clothing & Fashion provides students with an understanding of 
clothing construction and fashion. Students learn how to read pattern guides & directions, they develop the ability to thread and operate a sewing machine. Students construct a garment of their choice.   Students will also have knowledge of fashion through the years, research fashion designers and what it takes to become a fashion designer.

 

INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURE

Introduction to Agriculture is designed to present students to all aspects of the agricultural program and the FFA. Concepts and skills learned will include the following: The FFA organization, Parliamentary procedure, Soils, Weed identification, Insects, Plant propagation, Ag chemicals, Sustainable agriculture, Record books, Livestock judging, Small animals, Livestock production, Animal health, Genetics, Meat identification, Ag technology, Welding, and Careers in agriculture. An Agricultural Current Event will be due every other Friday with oral evaluation. A Supervised Agricultural Experience Program (SAE) will be graded as 20% of the final grade.
 

INTRODUCTION TO ART

Intro to Art is a survey course that introduces the student to as many different types of art processes and media as possible. There is an emphasis on drawing, which is a learnable skill and is used in many forms of art. Drawing media includes pencil, charcoal, colored pencil, pastels, pen and ink, and oil pastel, to name a few. Students will also learn to work with clay, tempera paint, as well as printmaking. Students will learn about commercial art, available art and art related careers, and the importance of art in the world around them. Intro to Art students will learn about Art History by exploring different time periods. They will also learn how to view art critically, and how to express themselves through the art they create. 

 

INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS

Students will study a wide range of topics related to business.  These include: Our Economic Environment, Business and Government in Our Global Economy, Technology for Business Decisions, Careers in Our Global Economy, Consumers in the Economy, Financial Institutions and Banking Services, Credit in Our Economy, Savings and Investment Strategies, Risk Management, Personal Financial Management, and Small Business Management.
 

INTRODUCTION TO TECHNOLOGY

This program is based on exploring new industrial processes.  A cluster of areas are explored, which consist of welding, power mechanics, drafting, computer drafting, Metric 500, an CNC Lathe.  In each of these areas the subject matter is more academic in information.  The students develop a working knowledge of each area and work on actual problems faced in industry.

 

LIFE SKILLS

This is a comprehensive introductory Family and Consumer Sciences class.  Units on self, personality, goal setting, challenges, communication, family, friends, management of time and money, laundry and home care are studied in the fall.  The spring semester includes units on foods and nutrition with foods labs, clothing and construction with a sewing project, housing with an interior design project, and an introduction to child development.  
 

LIFETIME FITNESS/HEALTH

This class will be open to grades 9-12, with an emphasis on individual fitness and conditioning improvement through activities such as running, weight training, plyometrics, stretching exercises and aerobics.  Students are expected to improve their strength levels, lower their resting heart rate, improve their agility, and become more flexible as a result of his/her individual program.  Students will be expected to maintain a weight training log and resting heart rate log.  The course is designed to demonstrate fitness activities and habits that students can use after graduation.  All LCC students involved in athletics are encouraged to take this course once the physical education requirements have been met.

LIFETIME SPORTS/HEALTH

High school students will participate in seasonal activities such as swimming, pickleball, CPR, flag football, basketball, softball, bocce ball, archery, badminton, weight lifting, bowling, golf, and volleyball.  Each activity unit will include practicing skills, learning rules and dimensions, and playing or participating in the activity.  *Fitness testing will be done in the fall and spring.

Students will be in health for one semester.  During this time students will study units on emotional development, mental health and mental disorders, stress, physical fitness, nutrition and weight control, caring for the body, conception and birth (including male and female reproductive systems, conception and prenatal development), adolescence, marriage and parenthood, aging and death, drugs, alcohol, and smoking, infectious diseases (including sexually transmitted diseases, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, first aid and environmental health).  The course is designed to give students information in all areas of health-physical, social, emotional and environmental.

MECHANICS/WELDING/ELECTRICITY

In this class, students will learn the concepts and basic skills necessary for a career in welding and engine repair. The first semester will be devoted to welding, starting with shop safety. Skills to be mastered with different welding tools include flat welds, fillet welds, t-welds, vertical welds, horizontal welds, and overhead welds. A project will be designed, and constructed to develop skills related to metal fabrication. The second semester will be devoted to small engines and auto mechanics with topics including: Engine designs, two stroke, four stroke, and diesel engines, engine parts, and engine maintenance. Small and large engines will be disassembled, repaired, and assembled in class. Other agricultural skills to be mastered include operation of a Global Positioning System unit, surveying, sprayer calibration, and planter calibration. Projects will be graded as 20% of the final grade.

House wiring is offered the first semester to students in grades 10-12.  Topics covered are electrical terms, conductors, electrical cord safety, conduit, boxes, switches, outlets, service requirements, house wiring circuits and modernizing electrical systems. Students spend 7 weeks working in the lab on actual house wiring circuits.  A competency test over 10 circuits is given at the end of the first semester.  The main objective of this semester is to gain the understanding and knowledge to be able to wire a house. Second semester basic electronics covers topics on the science of electronics, sources of electricity, circuits and power, magnetism, electric motors.  About 7 weeks are spent on assembling an AM radio from a Heath Kit.  The main objective is to give each student a background in electronics, and some hands-on-experience in building a radio from a kit.

PAINTING

Painting class will start with learning about color theory. We will work on color combinations, meanings and how to manipulate them. The students will go in depth in different styles and techniques. Working with Tempera, acrylic,
watercolor, and inks on paper, canvas and wood.

PERSONAL FINANCE

Students learn fundamental life skills, such as calculating gross income, net income, opening a checking account, paying for insurance, cash purchases, charge accounts and credit cards, housing costs, sales (markup), and more.  We also incorporate some Excel projects that relate to the chapters.  Students should have a working knowledge of Excel.

Projected chapters covered but not limited to:  Workshops 1-42, which covers basic math skills, Chapters 1-10, 16.

Projects:  We work on Excel Projects that relate to the subject matter we cover.
 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH

This course will combine components of the Lifetime Sports course with an emphasis on individual fitness and activities.  Topics from the Lifetime Sports class will include pickleball, basketball, volleyball, bocce ball, ultimate frisbee, swimming, badminton, and other activities.  Individual activities will include archery, horseshoes, orienteering, fitness walks, weight lifting, bowling, golf, and an emphasis on personal fitness and personal fitness assessment.

Students will be in health for one semester.  During this time students will study units on emotional development, mental health and mental disorders, stress, physical fitness, nutrition and weight control, caring for the body, conception and birth (including male and female reproductive systems, conception and prenatal development), adolescence, marriage and parenthood, aging and death, drugs, alcohol, and smoking, infectious diseases (including sexually transmitted diseases, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, first aid and environmental health).  The course is designed to give students information in all areas of health-physical, social, emotional and environmental.

PLANT SCIENCE

This class will learn concepts related to botany, soil science, crop science, horticulture, and landscape design. Topics to be covered in these areas include: Soil fertility, Soil conservation, Organic matter, Crop production, Forage production, Irrigation systems and management, Sustainable agriculture, Plant diseases, Insects, Plant propagation, Hydroponics, Floriculture, Landscape designs, Genetics and Biotechnology.

An Agricultural Current Event will be due every other Friday with written and oral evaluation.

A Supervised Agricultural Experience Program (SAE) will be graded as 20% of the final grade.

 

SMALL ANIMAL VET

This course is designed to provide basic instruction in small animal care for students interested in pursuing a degree in veterinary medicine specializing in small animal care. It will provide students with skills and concepts involved with the care and management of companion animals. Topics covered include disease, parasites, feeding, shelter, grooming, and general animal care. Laboratory activities provide students with the hands-on experience and skills needed to participate in Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs and FFA Career Development Events.

SPANISH I

The Spanish I curriculum focuses on written and oral communication.  Basic Spanish grammar, vocabulary, reading, writing, listening and speaking skills are emphasized. The textbook, workbook, worksheets, and classroom practice provide opportunities to use the language, and to explore the Hispanic culture.
 

SPANISH II

Spanish II continues the curriculum of Spanish I with more in-depth grammar and vocabulary study.  Reading, writing, listening and speaking skills continue to be emphasized.
 

SPANISH III

Spanish III begins with an intensive review of the basics covered in Spanish I and Spanish II.  Using the skills previously learned, the students will continue to improve their reading, writing, speaking, and comprehension skills.
 

SPANISH IV

Spanish IV begins with an intensive review of the basics covered in Spanish I, Spanish II, and Spanish III.  Using the skills previously learned, the students will continue to improve their reading, writing, speaking, and comprehension skills.
 

WOODS I

In the class the student has a full year of beginning woodworking.  The first 9-10 weeks of school is all classroom with the following areas of study: tool care, hand tools, power tools. The student begins work in the lab on a project general knowledge of woodworking. Open to all students 10-12.
 

 

 

  • RSS Icon
  • Facebook Icon
  • Twitter Icon
  • YouTube Icon

High School502 Wakefield St.P.O. Box 8

Laurel, NE  68745p. 402.256.3731f. 402.256.9468

Sign up for the News Update.

Translate this Page

Back To Top